Is it legal for an employer to ask an applicant if they are authorized to work?

Is it legal for an employer to ask an applicant if they are authorized to work?

It is lawful, however, for an employer to ask an interviewee if they are authorized to work in the U.S. As of 2021, 27 states and the District of Columbia have passed bans on asking job applicants …

Is it illegal for an employer to ask you personal questions?

Depending on how they are asked, though, questions about personal topics, such as marital status, race, and health, are more than just poor manners; they are illegal under federal and some state and local laws. 1 2 3 Employers can use these types of questions to discriminate against applicants, and it is your right not to answer them.

Do you have to ask the second question when applying for a job?

If, however, an employer asks the second question, it should do so for all job applicants. An employer has no legal obligation to commence an immigration case. Therefore, if the job applicant answers “yes” to the second question, the employer need not consider the applicant further.

Can a employer ask questions about employment authorization?

The Department of Justice’s Office of Special Counsel (OSC) enforces the antidiscrimination provisions of the I-9 employment eligibility verification law, and the OSC has confirmed that employers may ask questions similar to the two stated above.

It is lawful, however, for an employer to ask an interviewee if they are authorized to work in the U.S. As of 2021, 27 states and the District of Columbia have passed bans on asking job applicants

Depending on how they are asked, though, questions about personal topics, such as marital status, race, and health, are more than just poor manners; they are illegal under federal and some state and local laws. 1 2 3 Employers can use these types of questions to discriminate against applicants, and it is your right not to answer them.

If, however, an employer asks the second question, it should do so for all job applicants. An employer has no legal obligation to commence an immigration case. Therefore, if the job applicant answers “yes” to the second question, the employer need not consider the applicant further.

The Department of Justice’s Office of Special Counsel (OSC) enforces the antidiscrimination provisions of the I-9 employment eligibility verification law, and the OSC has confirmed that employers may ask questions similar to the two stated above.