How to deal with unfair treatment at work?

How to deal with unfair treatment at work?

When you are facing unfair treatment at work it can take a while to realise that it’s not you that’s the problem but the person or people handing out the unfair treatment. It’s also sometimes not so easy to recognise that the way you’re being treated may actually be classed as discrimination, and is therefore against the law.

Is it illegal to treat someone in an unfair way?

It’s illegal to treat somebody in an unfair way, including harassment, because of any of their protected characteristics: Age. Disability. Gender reassignment. Marriage and civil partnership. Maternity and pregnancy. Race. Religion or belief. Sex.

How is unfair treatment linked to protected characteristic?

It might not be obvious how the unfair treatment is linked to a protected characteristic. For example, your employer might only hire managers who can work evenings and weekends. This could be discrimination against women because they’re more likely to have childcare commitments that stop them working evenings and weekends.

When to refer a case to the CCMA for unfair treatment?

The referral must be made within 90 days of the alleged unfair labour practice. The council or CCMA must attempt to resolve the dispute through conciliation. If the unfair labour practice concerns probation, the CCMA or council must deal with the dispute by ‘con-arb’.

Are there any forms of unfair treatment at work?

There are many forms of unfair treatment or harassment, and these include: The law on bullying and harassment is quite difficult to interpret, so if you feel you’re being badly treated at work and need some help, a good employment rights adviser might be your first port of call.

It’s illegal to treat somebody in an unfair way, including harassment, because of any of their protected characteristics: Age. Disability. Gender reassignment. Marriage and civil partnership. Maternity and pregnancy. Race. Religion or belief. Sex.

It might not be obvious how the unfair treatment is linked to a protected characteristic. For example, your employer might only hire managers who can work evenings and weekends. This could be discrimination against women because they’re more likely to have childcare commitments that stop them working evenings and weekends.

How to deal with unfairness in the workplace?

If you feel that you are being singled out because of a characteristic that is protected under federal or state law, such as your race, gender, religion or disability, file a complaint with your local Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Your claim will be investigated, and the EEOC will work with your employer to resolve the situation.