Are there any black executives in the workplace?

Are there any black executives in the workplace?

“These African American executives never reported feeling, even during the Obama years, that race was no longer relevant or that we had somehow collectively moved beyond race in the workplace,” Roberts says.

What was the percentage of African Americans in the US workforce?

In 1966, African-American Officials and Managers composed less than 1 percent of all Officials and Managers. By 2008, African-Americans’ participation rate in this category had increased to 6.94 percent. Unfortunately, it had slipped a little by 2013.

What’s the problem with black employees in the workplace?

The problem: These programs tend to focus on helping black employees fit into the status-quo culture, rather than eliminating systemic inequality within their organizations. Companies should focus on managing injustice, rather than “managing blackness,” Courtney McCluney and Veronica Rabelo write in their chapter of the book.

How to build a relationship with black employees?

These relationships can grow through day-to-day work interactions, but also through informal get-togethers. For instance, employees at one consulting company started a book club that focused on black writers and coordinated visits to African American museums and historical sites.

What does an African American employee resource group do?

The Employee Resource Groups for African American/Black employees work to create an inclusive environment for all African America /Black employees through their offerings of educational opportunities, networking, cultural events, and social gatherings. This group represents African American/Black employees at Corning.

What does Bank of America do for black employees?

Our Black Professional Group (BPG) was one of our first Employee Networks and now has more than 13,000 members in chapters across the U.S. BPG supports the recruitment, retention and promotion of Black/African American employees, offers mentoring to help develop leadership potential, and sponsors regular networking and virtual events.

“These African American executives never reported feeling, even during the Obama years, that race was no longer relevant or that we had somehow collectively moved beyond race in the workplace,” Roberts says.

In 1966, African-American Officials and Managers composed less than 1 percent of all Officials and Managers. By 2008, African-Americans’ participation rate in this category had increased to 6.94 percent. Unfortunately, it had slipped a little by 2013.