Who is a representative payee for Social Security?

Who is a representative payee for Social Security?

A representative payee is a surrogate or fiduciary appointed, upon application and following investigation, by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to administer the Social Security (SS) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits payable to a financially incapable beneficiary,…

Can a minor be a representative payee for SSA?

The law requires minor children and legally incompetent adults to have payees. In all other situations, adult beneficiaries are presumed to be capable of managing benefits. If there is evidence to the contrary, however, SSA may appoint a representative payee.

What’s the difference between a payee and an authorized representative?

Being an authorized representative, having power of attorney, or a joint bank account with the beneficiary is not the same as being a payee. These arrangements do not give legal authority to negotiate and manage a beneficiary’s Social Security and/or SSI benefits. In order to be a payee, you must apply for and be appointed by Social Security.

Who is a representative payee for a beneficiary?

A state or local government agency with responsibility for income maintenance, social service, health care, or fiduciary duties, and Regularly serving as a representative payee for at least five beneficiaries, not be a creditor of the beneficiary (some exceptions apply), and

A representative payee is a surrogate or fiduciary appointed, upon application and following investigation, by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to administer the Social Security (SS) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits payable to a financially incapable beneficiary,…

The law requires minor children and legally incompetent adults to have payees. In all other situations, adult beneficiaries are presumed to be capable of managing benefits. If there is evidence to the contrary, however, SSA may appoint a representative payee.

Do you have to be a payee to be an authorized representative?

Being an authorized representative, having power of attorney, or a joint bank account with the beneficiary is not the same as being a payee. These arrangements do not give legal authority to negotiate and manage a beneficiary’s Social Security and/or SSI benefits.

A state or local government agency with responsibility for income maintenance, social service, health care, or fiduciary duties, and Regularly serving as a representative payee for at least five beneficiaries, not be a creditor of the beneficiary (some exceptions apply), and