Where do public employees in New Jersey come from?

Where do public employees in New Jersey come from?

–Those applying come from a broad swath of state agencies, school districts and local government entities across the state — from the Office of the Governor to state hospitals, local prisons and state colleges.

Can a NJ public employee live out of State?

If you are being paid by New Jersey taxpayers, you should pay state and local taxes and be a state resident. But in the more than seven years the law has been in effect, at least 2,310 public workers have been given temporary or permanent exemptions to live out of state, according to an NJ Advance Media review of state records.

Can a NJ Transit Employee work out of State?

So, NJ Transit is free to hire out-of-state workers for those jobs. The “New Jersey First” law has also been cited in a lawsuit against Rutgers University challenging whether four appointed members of the Rutgers Board of Governors should lose their unpaid positions because they live outside of New Jersey.

Who was the teacher who wanted to move out of New Jersey?

The Mahwah kindergarten teacher was blunt and unapologetic. She wanted out of New Jersey. Sitting before the state’s Employee Residency Review Committee, the teacher quickly made her case. She wanted to move to Manhattan to live with her boyfriend. She didn’t own a car.

Do you have to live in New Jersey to work in NJ?

If you already work for State or local government as of September 1, 2011, and you do not live in New Jersey, you are not required to move to New Jersey. However, if you begin your office, position or employment on September 1, 2011 or later, you must reside in New Jersey.

If you work for New Jersey — in a state, county, municipal or school district job — New Jersey should be your home, the law said. If you are being paid by New Jersey taxpayers, you should pay state and local taxes and be a state resident.

If you are being paid by New Jersey taxpayers, you should pay state and local taxes and be a state resident. But in the more than seven years the law has been in effect, at least 2,310 public workers have been given temporary or permanent exemptions to live out of state, according to an NJ Advance Media review of state records.

–Those applying come from a broad swath of state agencies, school districts and local government entities across the state — from the Office of the Governor to state hospitals, local prisons and state colleges.

So, NJ Transit is free to hire out-of-state workers for those jobs. The “New Jersey First” law has also been cited in a lawsuit against Rutgers University challenging whether four appointed members of the Rutgers Board of Governors should lose their unpaid positions because they live outside of New Jersey.