When did my daughter get diagnosed with bipolar?

When did my daughter get diagnosed with bipolar?

Depression started in 10 th grade; “weird” happiness, grandiosity ( hypomania) in 12 th grade and then intense irritability. We both started researching what could be wrong and we both came up with possibly bipolar disorder. She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder II, along with major depression and anxiety.

Can a parent help an adult with bipolar disorder?

However, if the adult child has previously had one or more periods of sustained stability, especially concurrent with good mental health treatment, then parents can at least have a sense of what’s possible. One caveat here would be if the period of good functioning occurred long ago.

How is Lucy dealing with her bipolar disorder?

Lucy* opens up about her family’s ‘scary and gut wrenching’ long road of emotional ups and downs in dealing with their teenage daughter’s bipolar disorder II. Tell us about your daughter’s diagnosis…

Why is Trisha not comfortable with her bipolar disorder?

Trisha was convinced that what professionals labeled as bipolar illness was simply the manifestation of her artistic temperament. Judith explains that she is tired of organizing her life around her daughter’s dysfunction. She’s not comfortable having guests over. She doesn’t travel and risk leaving her daughter alone.

How old is my daughter with bipolar disorder?

My daughter is 14 years old, and was diagnosed for bipolar disorder with psychotic features when she was 11. The last three years have been the most difficult times I’ve experienced in my life. I grew up with a bipolar father, but with him the disease was on the periphery for me.

Who is divorced mother of child with bipolar disorder?

Judith, a divorced mother of a 26-year-old daughter with bipolar I disorder, consulted with me to discuss concerns about what to do in relation to her daughter’s failure to manage her life independently.

What did having a child with bipolar teach me?

Any feelings of being in control are fanciful at best, and I have spent my life fighting for this to no avail. Control over my life, my body, my children, my parents, my husband and even my friends. Having a child with a mental illness has taught me more than ever that I cannot control other people. Over time I have come to accept this.

Lucy* opens up about her family’s ‘scary and gut wrenching’ long road of emotional ups and downs in dealing with their teenage daughter’s bipolar disorder II. Tell us about your daughter’s diagnosis…