What notices are required for COBRA?

What notices are required for COBRA?

Group health plans must give each employee and spouse a general notice describing COBRA rights within the first 90 days of coverage. Group health plans can satisfy this requirement by including the general notice in the plan’s summary plan description and giving it to the employee and spouse within this time limit.

How long do you have to notify an employee of Cobra?

“In those two instances, you have 60 days to notify the administrator. The administrator has 14 days after notice from you to notify the person who is entitled to COBRA coverage.” Once that is completed, the employee has 60 days from the time of the notice or the event to come back and notify you that they want coverage.

Can a company require an employee to pay for Cobra?

No. An employer can require an electing employee to pay up to 102% of the cost of the medical coverage in order to continue coverage under COBRA.

When do you no longer qualify for Cobra coverage?

If employees do not notify you within 60 days, they are no longer eligible for COBRA. Depending on the qualifying event, coverage can last different amounts of times. This is a brief overview of the COBRA notice timeline and what HR’s role in the whole thing is.

When does a qualifying event occur for Cobra?

When a qualifying event occurs and COBRA is triggered, you must offer the employee the option to continue coverage under all health care plans that the employee is enrolled in at the time the qualifying event occurs, which can include:

When does an employer have to notify an employee of Cobra?

 An employer that is subject to COBRA requirements is required to notify its group health plan administrator within 30 days after an employee’s employment is terminated, or  employment hours are reduced.  Within 14 days of that notification, the plan administrator is required to notify the individual of his or her COBRA rights.

What happens to my Cobra plan if I get Fired?

In general, employees (and their spouses and dependents) who lose coverage under an employer’s health plan due to termination of employment or reduction of hours are entitled to continue that coverage for up to 18 months.

If employees do not notify you within 60 days, they are no longer eligible for COBRA. Depending on the qualifying event, coverage can last different amounts of times. This is a brief overview of the COBRA notice timeline and what HR’s role in the whole thing is.

Do you have to pay 102% for Cobra?

No. An employer can require an electing employee to pay up to 102% of the cost of the medical coverage in order to continue coverage under COBRA. The 102% represents the total premium (employee’s share plus the employer’s share) plus a 2% administrative fee.