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What is the law for overtime pay in Oklahoma?

What is the law for overtime pay in Oklahoma?

Specifically, Oklahoma law requires that employees be paid 1.5 times their normal hourly rate when they work more than 40 hours in a single seven-day period. This requirement also applies to time worked in excess of 40 hours a week, not eight hours in one day.

When do you not have to pay overtime in Oklahoma?

Overtime pay is not required by Oklahoma overtime laws for hours worked in excess of any particular number in one day—for example, an employer could have you work a 24 hour shift without paying overtime if you worked no more than 16 additional hours in the week.

Can a non exempt employee not be paid overtime?

Employers must pay non-exempt employees for time worked “off-the-clock”, including overtime pay. Misclassification is another common FLSA overtime provision violation. Employers will sometimes convince their employees that because they are paid a salary they are not eligible for overtime hours.

What do you need to know about overtime pay?

Overtime pay is the amount an employer pays an employee for hours worked over 40 hours in a given week. The main rule is that non-exempt employees are eligible for overtime pay. This is to say that employers must pay most non-exempt employees “time and a half,” a.k.a overtime. Most exempt employees are excluded from the overtime pay rule.

Can a employer refuse to pay overtime to an employee?

Employers will sometimes convince their employees that because they are paid a salary they are not eligible for overtime hours. In many cases the employer is wrong. The only employees not eligible for overtime pay are those who fall into certain categories that Congress mandated as exempt from overtime pay.

Overtime pay is not required by Oklahoma overtime laws for hours worked in excess of any particular number in one day—for example, an employer could have you work a 24 hour shift without paying overtime if you worked no more than 16 additional hours in the week.

How much does an employer have to pay for overtime?

Learn the rules here. Federal and state laws require most employers to pay overtime. The overtime premium is 50% of the employee’s usual hourly wage. This means an employee who works overtime must be paid “time and a half”—the employee’s usual hourly wage plus the 50% overtime premium—for every overtime hour worked.

What are the rules for overtime for nonexempt employees?

There is a lot of confusion and many misconceptions amongst both employers and employees when it comes to overtime rules. Overtime (according to federal and many states’ laws) is the time a nonexempt employee works over 40 hours in a single workweek. For every hour over 40, that employee must be compensated with 1.5 times his or her normal wage.

Can a company refuse to pay you for overtime?

Your employer cannot require you to work more than 40 hours in a week, and then refuse to pay you time and a half for any time you worked over 40 hours (assuming you’re nonexempt). They have every right to set a schedule that sees you working over 40 hours, but only so long as they properly pay you for the overtime hours you work.