What do you need to know about the Ely test?

What do you need to know about the Ely test?

Rectus Femoris Ely’s test or Duncan-Ely test is used to assess rectus femoris spasticity or tightness. [1] Technique[edit| edit source] The patient lies prone in a relaxed state. The therapist is standing next to the patient, at the side of the leg that will be tested. One hand should be on the lower back, the other holding the leg at the heel.

How to do Ely’s Physiopedia Test Step by step?

The patient lies prone in a relaxed state. The therapist is standing next to the patient, at the side of the leg that will be tested. One hand should be on the lower back, the other holding the leg at the heel. Passively flex the knee in a rapid fashion. The heel should touch the buttocks. Test both sides for comparison.

Is the Duncan Ely test a specific indicator of spasticity?

Perry et al showed that the Duncan-Ely test is not a specific indicator of rectus tightness or spasticity since it elicits electromyographic (EMG) responses in both the rectus femoris and the iliacus in many subjects with CP. Chambers et al reported that the Ely test has no predictive value for abnormal rectus femoris EMG activity.

What is the specificity of the Ely test?

Studies show Ely’s test has a sensitivity ranging from 56% to 59% and the specificity ranging from 64% to 85%. Critical Review. Though the Duncan-Ely test is commonly performed clinically, the importance of a positive Duncan-Ely test for rectus femoris spasticity is uncertain.

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How does Ely’s test work for back pain?

Passively flex the knee in a rapid fashion. The heel should touch the buttocks. Test both sides for comparison. The test is positive when the heel cannot touch the buttocks, the hip of the tested side rises up from the table, the patient feels pain or tingling in the back or legs. This opens in a new window.

Can you use the brush and mulch transfer station in Ely?

Only residents within the City limits of Ely will be allowed to use the brush and mulch recycle area. All others will need to use St. Louis County’s Transfer Station. Social Distancing measures will be taken to ensure safety. The gate to the “old dump” will be locked when the City is not present.

Rectus Femoris Ely’s test or Duncan-Ely test is used to assess rectus femoris spasticity or tightness. [1] Technique[edit| edit source] The patient lies prone in a relaxed state. The therapist is standing next to the patient, at the side of the leg that will be tested. One hand should be on the lower back, the other holding the leg at the heel.

The patient lies prone in a relaxed state. The therapist is standing next to the patient, at the side of the leg that will be tested. One hand should be on the lower back, the other holding the leg at the heel. Passively flex the knee in a rapid fashion. The heel should touch the buttocks. Test both sides for comparison.

Perry et al showed that the Duncan-Ely test is not a specific indicator of rectus tightness or spasticity since it elicits electromyographic (EMG) responses in both the rectus femoris and the iliacus in many subjects with CP. Chambers et al reported that the Ely test has no predictive value for abnormal rectus femoris EMG activity.

How is the Duncan-Ely test used in medicine?

The Ely Test (or Duncan-Ely test) has been accepted as a clinical tool to assess rectus femoris spasticity by passively flexing the knee rapidly while the patient lies prone in a relaxed state.

Is the Ely test a good predictive of rectus spasticity?

For the same variables the positive predictive value ranged from 91 to 98% and the negative predictive value ranged from 4 to 19%. The Ely test was shown to have a good positive predictive value (i.e. the certainty about the presence of rectus spasticity in patients with a positive Ely test result) for rectus femoris dysfunction during gait.