What are some of the challenges with the diagnosis of bipolar disorder?

What are some of the challenges with the diagnosis of bipolar disorder?

Even with the advances in DSM-5 nosology, accurate diagnosis of bipolar disorder remains challenging because of its: (1) complex, variable symptoms (with different bipolar subtypes, mood states, courses, and age-dependent presentations); and (2) confounding comorbidities (eg, substance abuse, anxiety, disruptive …

Why is it difficult to diagnose bipolar disorder?

A major reason for the difficult diagnosis is the challenge of differentiating bipolar disorder type I or II from unipolar depression—an illness characterised by recurrent depressive episodes— especially in patients who present during a depressive episode and in those with no clear history of mania or hypomania.

What are the common responses to a diagnosis of bipolar disorder?

Bipolar disorder can cause your mood to swing from an extreme high to an extreme low. Manic symptoms can include increased energy, excitement, impulsive behaviour, and agitation. Depressive symptoms can include lack of energy, feeling worthless, low self-esteem and suicidal thoughts.

What is the diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder?

The diagnosis for bipolar disorder requires at least one depressive and one manic or hypomanic episode. Your mental health specialist will ask about your thoughts and feelings during and after these episodes. They’ll want to know if you feel in control during the mania and how long the episodes last.

Can a doctor still miss the diagnosis of bipolar disorder?

We’re still faced with the reality of a mental health clinician sitting with a patient and relying upon clinical interview to come up with a clear picture to identify or rule out the presence of bipolar disorder. Sometimes even with extensive inquiry and careful consideration of the data obtained, clinicians still miss the bipolar diagnosis.

Can a physical examination tell you if you have bipolar disorder?

While a physical examination can reveal a patient’s overall state of health, the doctor must hear about the bipolar signs and symptoms from the patient in order to effectively diagnose and treat bipolar disorder.

Is it hard to come out with bipolar disorder?

The decision to disclose your diagnosis of bipolar disorder is very difficult. Here is everything you need to know before you go public. When it comes to sharing your diagnosis of bipolar disorder, “coming out” is hard to do, but it may be the best thing for you.

Can a family history help you diagnose bipolar disorder?

Because bipolar disorder sometimes has a genetic component, family history can be helpful in making a diagnosis. (Most people with bipolar disorder, however, do not have a family history of bipolar disorder.)

How does a doctor know if you have bipolar disorder?

(Most people with bipolar disorder, however, do not have a family history of bipolar disorder.) Also, the doctor will ask detailed questions about your bipolar symptoms. Other questions may focus on reasoning, memory, ability to express yourself, and ability to maintain relationships. Do other illnesses mimic symptoms of bipolar disorder?

Because bipolar disorder sometimes has a genetic component, family history can be helpful in making a diagnosis. (Most people with bipolar disorder, however, do not have a family history of bipolar disorder.)

What happens when a loved one denies bipolar diagnosis?

You may find yourself watching helplessly as behaviors tied to untreated bipolar lead to family distress, broken relationships, problems at school and work, money woes, and alcohol and drug abuse. If you try to help someone in denial, you will probably be accused of interfering if you even mention the word bipolar.

How many people have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder?

About 3% of Americans may have bipolar disorder during their lifetimes. Here are 18 famous people who were diagnosed with bipolar disorder. What does a doctor need to know to diagnose bipolar disorder? A bipolar disorder diagnosis is made only by taking careful note of symptoms, including their severity, length, and frequency.