Is it better to leave a job or get a better offer?

Is it better to leave a job or get a better offer?

In such a situation, it’s usually best to leave rather than stay and be miserable. The new job is a quantum leap in income and responsibility. If the new job offers a more senior position and substantially higher pay (say, 15% to 20% or more), making the change is a no-brainer.

Are there good reasons to leave a job?

There are many, many good reasons for leaving a job and an even greater number of bad ones. If you’re on the market for a new position, its highly likely that you’re going to be asked why you left your last job during the interviewing process.

When is it a good idea to change jobs?

If the new job offers a more senior position and substantially higher pay (say, 15% to 20% or more), making the change is a no-brainer. As long as you have no reservations about the position, take the chance to advance your career and add money to your wallet.

Is it better to stay put or take a better job?

At first glance, the temptation is to follow the opportunity and take the better job, but sometimes the wiser course of action is to stay put. How do you make this important decision?

In such a situation, it’s usually best to leave rather than stay and be miserable. The new job is a quantum leap in income and responsibility. If the new job offers a more senior position and substantially higher pay (say, 15% to 20% or more), making the change is a no-brainer.

What happens when you accept a new job offer?

You applied and interviewed for a new job. It sounded like a great fit. You were excited when you got a job offer from the new company, so of course you accepted. You got ready to start at your new position and gave notice at your old job. But then your last day ended.

What happens when you leave a good job?

Two years after I left a job at a top-20 bank, Lehman went bankrupt (followed by General Motors!). Remember, there’s no such thing as a “permanent job” and no such thing as a “safe company.” Working for a reputable organization is one factor to weigh into your decision—not the only factor.

If the new job offers a more senior position and substantially higher pay (say, 15% to 20% or more), making the change is a no-brainer. As long as you have no reservations about the position, take the chance to advance your career and add money to your wallet.