How does an executor of an estate in Pennsylvania?

How does an executor of an estate in Pennsylvania?

To conclude the estate in Pennsylvania, the executor prepares an accounting and a schedule of distribution for the beneficiary and the Register of Wills. If the beneficiaries agree with the plan for distribution, the estate can be distributed without the need for an audit.

Who is the executor of a deceased person’s estate?

An executor is the person named in a will who handles the estate of a deceased person, called the “testator.” Usually, the testator names a spouse, adult child, friend or relative as executor. If the primary named executor cannot serve, most wills name one or more alternates.

Do you need an attorney to be named executor of your husband’s estate?

No, you do not need an attorney to be named executor of your deceased husband’s estate. But, you are well advised to get one. You would not do surgery on yourself if you needed an operation. There are many technical aspects of handling an estate, and hiring someone to meet those burdens would be very wise.

Can a co-executor of an estate pass away?

If you have not named co-executors, but have named alternative executors, the next alternate is appointed by the court, unless, of course, they are unavailable or unwilling to serve. Probating an estate can often take a long time. It is not uncommon for executors to pass away during the process.

Who is the executor of an estate in PA?

If a deceased person did not leave a will, the person appointed to fulfill the executor’s role is called a personal representative. In Pennsylvania, executors administer estates through the Register of Wills in the county where the decedent lived.

An executor is the person named in a will who handles the estate of a deceased person, called the “testator.” Usually, the testator names a spouse, adult child, friend or relative as executor. If the primary named executor cannot serve, most wills name one or more alternates.

Can a personal representative be the executor of a will?

If you’re named the executor (also called a personal representative), you’ll have many details to manage. This estate executor checklist for executing a will can help you more easily navigate the process while making sure none of your duties slip through the cracks. 1. Obtain a Copy of the Death Certificate

If you have not named co-executors, but have named alternative executors, the next alternate is appointed by the court, unless, of course, they are unavailable or unwilling to serve. Probating an estate can often take a long time. It is not uncommon for executors to pass away during the process.